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shweta_narayan
01 January 2020 @ 12:00 am
Hi!
I write stuff. And here, I mostly write about writing stuff and about writing-related issues. I've been posting poems, lately, and am likely to keep doing so.

Do feel free to friend me -- I shall be thrilled*. And do feel free to unfriend me -- I shall not be hurt. Though, if you are a real-life friend I'd like to know why -- because if I hurt your feelings I'd like to mend that, and if I didn't I'd like not to have to fret :)

I'd also love it to pieces if you tell me a bit about yourself, if I'm unlikely to know you from your lj name (my lj powers are weak). At some point when I'm finding it a bit less overwhelming, I'll be friending people back; I just haven't the focus to figure it all out just now.

I think that's everything for now :)

* ETA: Though, please read this before deciding if you want to friend me, because I am not necessarily going to make you comfortable, and I am entirely out of patience with so-called allies who only want validation & cookies.
 
 
 
shweta_narayan
27 March 2015 @ 10:58 am

We are happy now to say
the next issue's on its way(1)
so please marvel at the cover
and how mermippo does hover

(1) Callooh! Callay!

Give a cheer for all the poets
who gave this joke a go - it's
thanks to them we have an issue
for which you won't need a tissue (2)

(2) Well, you may well need a tissue
for the contents of this issue
but for not-the-usual reason -
just the poems over-pleasin'!




Poetry:

Mari Ness, Three Limericks (mariness)

Anatoly Belilovsky, The Were-Cactus (loldoc)

S. Brackett Robertson, Bathyscape (aliseadae)

Susannah Mandel, To The Family In The Sycamore Across The Street

Emily Jiang, Ballerina Hippo Mippo (emily_jiang)

Rachael K. Jones, Do Mermippos Dream of Electric Sharks?

Pear Nuallak, A Mermaid in The Mermaid

Alexandra Seidel, A Hippolimerick
(alexa_seidel)

David Sklar, Before I Kill You (An Arch-Villainelle)

Jaymee Goh, Yes, I Am A Were (fantasyecho)

Kathy Figueroa, A Snippet of a Tale

Alexandra Erin, The Spoon-Drawer Gnome (alexandraerin)

 
 
shweta_narayan
05 March 2015 @ 02:17 pm
I'll be there. Will you? :)
Tags:
 
 
shweta_narayan
This post, I mean.

I said, "Able neurotypical not-fat not-poor straight cis white anglophone American Christian men are considered to be prototypical humans."

Someone on boingboing pointed out that college-educated should be in that list. They are absolutely right. I missed it because we are often unaware of the ways in which we match the prototype. The default is unmarked.

Someone on metafilter claimed that I'm falling into my own categorical trap, which I think means projecting my own experience, when I say that Americans are prototypical, since they are a tiny percentage of the global population.  If I interpreted them right then this is wrong, for a few reasons.

1) I'm an Indian national. And, yes I live in the US now, but I didn't when I wrote the post. And I've lived in a lot of countries; US-centrism is a phenomenon I've encountered in all of them. (Consider the impact of white Americans getting killed. The whole world is expected to care. It's just not true for anyone else - unless it plays conveniently into existing bigotries/narratives of course.)

2) Percentage is irrelevant. Americans' position (in the absence of other context) as global prototype human has to do with their global power and prestige, and their extremely effective imperialism.

3) Going back to college-educated - if I were American, I probably wouldn't have thought to put that modifier on the list. Like I didn't think to put college-educated on the list. The default is unmarked - and the way I fall into my own categorical trap is in the things I don't notice.

----

Having said all that - prototypes absolutely do vary between people & communities, based on experience; and relevant categories and thus prototypes do absolutely shift with context. Take all generalizations as exactly that.
 
 
shweta_narayan
14 February 2015 @ 10:12 am
Apparently my post here has recently turned up on Making Light, BoingBoing, and Metafilter.

(Which of course makes me wish I'd written it better! And as one commenter on BoingBoing TOTALLY correctly points out, I left out college-educated in my listing of what makes the prototype. Which is not a coincidence at all; we tend not to think about the ways in which we ourselves are prototypical/default.)

But it also means I'm filtering non-friend comments now. Because we get gems like this: [edit to add: so far this is the only one. It's just of a type I've seen frequently elsewhere.]

"As a non-academic cis white male of 54 who knows he's benefitted from this subconscious categorical thinking but who - I SWEAR - has always been a skinny long-haired "weirdo" not accepted by authority figures and who has followed closely the work and books by Boroditsky, Lakoff, and Feldman, I read this and sigh: what can I possibly say, except I AM A FUCKING ASSHOLE whose made everyone's live worse by being who I look like?

Nice work."


To which I replied:
White people in North America live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress. This insulated environment of racial protection builds white expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the ability to tolerate racial stress, leading to what I refer to as White Fragility. White Fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium. This paper explicates the dynamics of White Fragility. - Robin DiAngelo

I did not bother noting on the comment that this sort of defensive response is a form of oppressive behavior - an attempt to silence the speaker of unpalatable things. But I will note it here, as a thing not to do.

I won't be unfiltering any other such comments; this one can stand in as a token for the lot. If I get too many for my spoon level, I'll just close comments. But I would prefer not to be silenced - and to have worthwhile conversations in comments silenced - by oppressive behaviors.
 
 
shweta_narayan
28 January 2015 @ 03:13 pm
still-life-mippo4

I realized I never posted my drawing of our noble friend the mippo to lj.buddhistmippo is an excellent model; stays still and his smile never looks forced. He's the first drawing from life I've done in over a decade, how did that happen?

Pixel art, done in the GIMP with wacom tablet/stylus
 
 
shweta_narayan
27 January 2015 @ 11:26 pm
....on Monday.

Yes, this coming monday. We got the confirmation on Friday.

It's a major squee, of course. But guess which household resembles a distraught henhouse right now?

(btw this is why Stone Telling will be Delayed.)
 
 
shweta_narayan
01 January 2015 @ 06:17 pm
Originally posted by shweta_narayan at Extended submission periods
Stone Telling submissions period is EXTENDED for both Joke and Hope issues: updated guidelines here! http://stonetelling.com/guidelines.html

For (good!) reasons I can't disclose in public yet, we're going to be somewhat delayed on both - I can't work on them till February.  And I have definitely dropped the ball on signal boosting the sub period, so far.
But we're excited by the subs we've gotten so far and looking forward to seeing more :)
 
 
shweta_narayan
07 November 2014 @ 04:17 pm
Originally posted by rose_lemberg at Stone Telling 11 is here!
ST 11 cover

Stone Telling 11 is here!


We are very pleased to announce that a new issue of Stone Telling, Reverberations, has gone live – with fabulous poetry by voices all new to us, and a review of Lisa M. Bradley’s collection The Haunted Girl, by Alex Dally MacFarlane. We hope you give these treasures a read!


We also have many announcements to make. First is the rate increase – thanks to our Patreon supporters, we are increasing our pay from 5$ to 10$ a poem starting immediately, so that our new poets are paid at the new rate! The rates for nonfiction and epic length poetry remain unchanged, but we are hoping to raise our rates yet more with Patreon support, down the road.


Second, we have announced two reading periods, for ST 12 (Hope-themed), and ST13 (the Joke issue). For more information, please see the updated guidelines.


Third, we have added a new team member – Bogi Takács, whose work has appeared in ST previously, has joined the team as an assistant editor.


Last but not least, we still have a few outstanding blog post interviews with ST10 poets, and will be publishing these, as well as blog post interviews with ST11 poets.


Happy reading – and thank you, as always, for being here.


Originally published at RoseLemberg.net. You can comment here or there.

 
 
shweta_narayan
15 October 2014 @ 07:27 pm
Originally posted by rose_lemberg at Editorial confidentiality: a public statement

by Shweta Narayan and Rose Lemberg

Recently, an editor outed a pseudonymous writer using the writer’s private information available to to him as an editor/publisher. The editor in question later claimed that he received permission from the author in question. The author in question has not, to our knowledge, made a public statement either confirming or denying that permission was given.*

Editors and publishers often have access to their submitters’ legal information, and more – the submitters’ wallet name, address, phone, etc. This one-directional access creates a power imbalance between editors and authors; trust in editorial discretion is necessary for submitters – all submitters, but especially those who may fear violence or other reprisals – to be able to work in this field.

As editors of Stone Telling magazine, we, Shweta Narayan and Rose Lemberg, believe that when editors publicly disclose such information, it erodes trust between editors and writers, and creates an atmosphere of suspicion and fear in the community. Even when permission is given, if a formerly pseudonymous author desires to make legal and other information publicly available, it is best done by someone other than an editor.

Certain information may need to be shared when disciplinary action is at stake, e.g. by conventions or legal authorities, but we feel that a public outing of writers by editors/publishers is problematic even in these cases.

As editors of Stone Telling magazine, we, Shweta Narayan and Rose Lemberg, pledge never to publicly reveal confidential information disclosed to us by submitters – this includes people whose work we choose to publish, and people whose work we choose not to publish. We have, previously, published work by pseudonymous authors while keeping strict confidentiality, and will continue to do so.

As an editor of An Alphabet of Embers and other anthologies, and as an editor of any future projects in fiction and poetry, I, Rose Lemberg, pledge never to publicly reveal confidential information disclosed to me by submitters – this includes people whose work I will choose to publish, and people whose work I will choose not to publish.

We call other editors in genre to join us in this pledge.

* This entry is strictly about editorial process. Comments about the situation alluded in the first paragraph, as well as about specific personalities involved, will not be allowed to pass moderation.


Originally published at RoseLemberg.net. You can comment here or there.